Satan's Last Stand

We had a bit of trouble on the farm yesterday. Our main rooster, Reggie the Colombian Wyandotte, got beat up quite badly by our rogue rooster.

Young, handsome Reggie

Young, handsome Reggie

We should only have one rooster, Reggie. We currently have 25 hens which is plenty for one rooster. When we brought home 6 australorp pullets last spring, one was a runty black rooster by mistake.

As he grew into himself, we knew we should cull him. 2 roosters can be too much, but he didn't really seem to cause much trouble. He's a bit rough with the ladies, unlike the gentleman Reggie. Reggie would shoo him away from the hens when he was feeling territorial, but he never was aggressive with the black roo. Which was probably his downfall yesterday. 

Reggie is popular with the ladies.  

Reggie is popular with the ladies.  

I went to collect eggs last night and saw what I thought was one of the light brahma hens in the nest box. It was dim, but looking closer I could tell it was Reggie. And he was bloody. I picked him up to get a closer look and saw that his comb was torn, eyes swollen shut, and feathers missing from the back of his head. There was also blood smeared across the walls of the coop. It was a brutal scene. 

I wasn't sure how to clean the wound, so I poured hydrogen peroxide over his comb and scalp hoping that would be enough to keep it from getting infected. Black rooster, who was nameless but now we are calling Satan, got locked out of the coop. Our thought was, we will decide in the moring which rooster stays depending on how Reggie looked. If he looked like he would survive. 

Damn Ye, Satan!  

Damn Ye, Satan!  

This morning, as soon as I opened the coop door, Satan came in and started punking the poor injured guy. Not cool, jerk. But, despite having one eye still swollen shut and a nasty scab of a comb, I think he will make it. He is eating and drinking, crowing, and walking around -gingerly- in the yard. He can't see where he's going very well, so he's being cautious. Satan is locked in the coop until he can be rehomed or dispatched. We are giving him a chance to find a new home first. He could be an aggressive protector for someone's flock. That's just not what we are looking for.